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Research 101

How to quote

Quotations are a way to use an source material's exact wording. You must put quotation marks around the part that you use and include a citation. In general, quotations should be used less often than paraphrases. Quotations are best suited for instances such as: when the author's word choices are tied to the meaning of the sentence, or when you are debating or interpreting the author's use of language. For more on the use of quotations vs. paraphrases, see The Bedford Handbook, page 504.

Key Points:

  • DO cite quotations
  • DO record the punctuation and capitalization (as well as the words) of the original source exactly.
  • DO capture the context surrounding the quotation.

Source: Hacker, Diana, and Nancy Sommers. The Bedford Handbook. 8th ed. Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2010. Print.

Examples

Does anything (or anyone) matter if it (or she) does not show up on the first page of a Google search? Sentence from the book: The Googlization of Everything, by Siva Vaidhyanathan
"Does anything (or anyone) matter if it (or she) does not show up on the first page of a Google search?"(Vaidhyanathan 7). Correct.  Exact copy of original sentence inside quotation marks with a citation at the end.
According to Vaidhyanathan, "the first page of a Google search" may be the only page of results that people care about (Vaidhyanathan 7). Correct. The author of the source is acknowledged. Quoted phrase is put into quotes, the meaning of the quote is kept in context by the paraphrase, and the Source is cited at the end.
"Does anything (or anyone) matter if it (or she)" appears after the "first page of a Google search?" (Vaidhyanathan 7). Correct. Two quotes from the source are put inside quotation marks, connected by your own words and then cited.
"Does anything (or anyone) matter if it (or she)" appears after the first page of a Google search? (Vaidhyanathan 7) Wrong. The first quote is put inside quotation marks, as it should, but the second part of the sentence is a direct quote from the source that does not appear inside quotation marks. This indicates to the reader that those are your own words, when in fact they are Vaidhyanathan's. This is plagiarism.
"Does anything (or anyone) matter if it (or she)" appears on "the first page of a Google search"? (Vaidhyanathan 7) Wrong. This quote misrepresents the meaning behind the sentence in the original source.
"Does anything (or anyone) matter if it (or she) does not show up on the first page of a Google search" Wrong. No citation at the end of the quote.

 Vaidhyanathan, Siva. The Googlization of Everything: (and why we should worry). Berkeley: University of California Press, 2011. Print.

Adapted from: Lipson, Charles. Doing Honest Work in College. 2nd ed. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2008. Print.